Heat-related deaths are expected to quadruple by 2050 due to global climate change.

Heatwaves are more likely because of climate change, and our homes aren't ready for them.

Over the next few decades, the number of heat-related deaths is expected to triple, according to the government’s consultants on climate change.

Temperatures might reach 40C as far north as York, making this the first UK red extreme heat warning of the year.

According to a new assessment, as many as 4.6 million houses in England are overheated.

New buildings were not subject to overheating regulations until this summer.

Climate Change Committee Deputy Chair Baroness Brown said, “We’ve been telling the government for over ten years that we are nothing like well equipped in the UK for the hot weather we are seeing today.”

“Overheating in people’s homes is a real problem that needs to be addressed.”

Over 500,000 new homes in the UK have been built since the Climate Change Committee first brought up the matter almost a decade ago, according to the committee.

Scientific evidence suggests that climate change is increasing the likelihood of heat waves.

Many new homes have floor-to-ceiling windows, which give a great view but can turn your apartment into a greenhouse in the summer.

In 2020, the UK Health Security Agency predicted that heatwaves would kill an additional 2,000 people.

Most health risks are caused by excessive heat in our houses, yet the government only implemented regulations requiring overheating tests in newly constructed homes in June this year.

According to James Prestwich of the Chartered Institute of Housing, which represents housing professionals, the absence of control is evident in the country’s housing stock.

According to Mr Prestwich, “we’ve seen structures created that don’t cope well with the increasing temperatures we’re now experiencing in July.

According to him, the issue is particularly apparent in newly constructed apartments in city centres.

Buildings with a lot of glass and poor airflow via corridors are what we’ve seen.

Sydney Taylor’s home reaches 36C in summer

If he’s describing Sydney Taylor’s apartment, it’s possible.

In the Ancoats neighbourhood, just outside of downtown Manchester, she lives in a striking new building on the banks of a canal.

Floor-to-ceiling windows offer a beautiful view, but the apartment becomes a greenhouse when the weather is hot.

This week could be much hotter, according to the woman who says she recorded 36C temperatures last summer.

She says, “I’ve just been cooking all day,” and I nod. There’s only a slight breeze from the fan, but it doesn’t cool me down.

Sydney claims that the temperature in the bedroom might reach over 30 degrees. To keep cool while lying in bed, “I use ice packs.”

Because of Sydney’s preexisting health issues, she believes the high temperatures in her house aggravate them.

Heat stress makes health problems worse that are already there.

It’s difficult to gauge the actual scope of the health risks of Britain’s hot homes.

Asthma, heart disease, and mental disorders are all made worse by heat stress.

As a result, the symptoms of heatstroke might be challenging to distinguish from other medical diseases, such as Covid-19.

Due to a lack of mention of heat as a component in death certificates, coroners and medical practitioners have difficulty determining how much of a health hazard it is.

For years, Baroness Brown has believed the government must take action to decrease the risk of overheating in millions of existing houses because of new regulations.

According to her, “we don’t have any policy for the existing building stock or indeed for allowed construction where things like office complexes are turned into houses.” “Heat-related mortality in the United States would more than likely triple if we don’t do more,” warns the CDC.

Professor Kevin Lomas, Loughborough University, who has been, for more than two decades researching home overheating in the UK, warns that retrofitting can be extremely costly.

According to him, many houses will require new windows or air conditioning.

Electric fans, closing windows and curtains during the day can assist, as well as opening them at night to allow cooler air to come in during the day.

Last summer, to avoid the oppressive heat, she spent two nights camped out in the hallway.

It’s difficult to gauge the actual scope of the health risks of Britain’s hot homes.

Asthma, heart disease, and mental disorders are all made worse by heat stress.

As a result, the symptoms of heatstroke might be challenging to distinguish from other medical diseases, such as Covid-19.

Due to a lack of mention of heat as a component in death certificates, coroners and medical practitioners have difficulty determining how much of a health hazard it is.

For years, Baroness Brown has believed the government must take action to decrease the risk of overheating in millions of existing houses because of new regulations.

According to her, “we don’t have any policy for the existing building stock or indeed for allowed construction where things like office complexes are turned into houses.” “Heat-related mortality in the United States would more than likely triple if we don’t do more,” warns the CDC.

Professor Kevin Lomas, Loughborough University, who has spent more than two decades researching home overheating in the United Kingdom, warns that retrofitting homes to lower their risk of being overheated can be extremely costly.

According to him, new windows and air conditioning are expected to be needed in many residences.

Electric fans, closing windows and curtains during the day can assist, as well as opening them at night to allow cooler air to come in during the day.

An electric fan – one short-term way to cool a home

If anything, things will worsen.

According to Imperial College London’s Dr Friederike Otto, a senior lecturer in climate science, “climate change is a full game changer and has already changed what would have been labelled extreme heat into quite a frequent summer weather.”

She claims that using fossil fuels has made every heatwave we’ve seen today much hotter.

Dr Vikki Thompson, a climate scientist at Cabot Institute for the Environment, University of Bristol, believes that the year’s warmest day is already nearly 1C higher than in the 1970s.

She notes that during 1961-1990, Britain’s hot weather length more than doubled.

The most important changes have occurred in the southeast of England, where the number of warm spells has tripled.

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