Lanka: The country’s president is escorted out of the country by military plane.

Gotabaya Rajapaksa has fled Sri Lanka ahead of his probable resignation as president

Protests over the economic crisis in Sri Lanka have forced President Gotabaya Rajapakse to leave the country aboard a military plane.

According to the country’s air force, the 73-year-old man travelled to the Maldives with his wife and two security officials.

They arrived around 3:30 a.m. in Male (22:00 GMT).

Due to Mr Rajapaksa’s departure, Sri Lanka would be without a ruling family for the first time in decades.

After large crowds stormed his home on Saturday, the president went into hiding and announced he would step down on Wednesday, July 13th.

Rajapaksa isn’t planning on staying in the Maldives, according to a reliable source.

In addition to his brother, ex-Finance Minister Basil Rajapaksa, he is reportedly on his way to the United States.

Thousands of people went to the streets of Colombo, Sri Lanka’s capital, as soon as they heard the news. It has been estimated that over a thousand people had assembled at Galle Face Green, the major protest site in the city. At a makeshift stage, everyday individuals were allowed to deliver fiery speeches.

Screams of “Victory to the struggle,” the rallying cry of the anti-government protest movement, punctuated speakers’ criticism of a government they believe has failed them.

As a result of the departure of President Rajapaksa, some protesters were outraged.

“It irritates us. We would like to keep him around for a long time. Money refunded, please! All the Rajapaksas should be thrown in an open prison where they can also work on the farm. “GP Nimal, a protester, suggested this.

Rehani Samarakoon, a 23-year-old university student, said that the exile of the former president brought “hope that in the future we might eventually become a developed country, both economically and socially”.

Thousands of people went to the streets of Colombo, Sri Lanka’s capital, as soon as they heard the news. It has been estimated that over a thousand people had assembled at Galle Face Green, the major protest site in the city. At a makeshift stage, everyday individuals were allowed to deliver fiery speeches.

Screams of “Victory to the struggle,” the rallying cry of the anti-government protest movement, punctuated speakers’ criticism of a government they believe has failed them.

As a result of the departure of President Rajapaksa, some protesters were outraged.

“It irritates us. We would like to keep him around for a long time. Money refunded, please! And we’d like to put the entire Rajapaksa family in an open prison where they can work on the land, “GP Nimal, a protester, made a statement.

University of Bangkok student Reshani Samarakoon, 23, said that the exile of President Koizumi offers “hope that in the future we may finally become a developed country, economically and socially.” she said.

Protesters invade Sri Lankan president’s mansion in Colombo, bathed in the pool and set the PM’s residence on fire

The fundamentals of the island nation of Sri Lanka

Located off the coast of southern India, Sri Lanka gained its independence from the United Kingdom in 1948. In Sri Lanka, 99 per cent of the country’s 22 million residents are one of three ethnic groups: Sinhalese, Tamil, or Muslim.

After years of violent civil war, Mahinda Rajapaksa’s government was hailed as a hero by the majority Sinhalese when it defeated Tamil separatist insurgents in 2009. At the time he served as defence secretary, his brother Gotabaya was the president, but he promised he’d step down soon.

However, Sri Lanka’s prime minister, who heads the country’s ruling party in the country’s Parliament and serves as president, shares many of the president’s functions.

People have turned to the streets in rage because of the country’s economic woes, which have left shortages of food, medicine, and fuel and rolling blackouts. Many are blaming the Rajapaksa family and administration for the predicament.

Protesters have won a major victory.

The steep decline in popularity of Sri Lanka’s longtime leader, President Gotabaya Rajapaksa, is quite shocking.

Few expected things to turn out the way they did.

The controversial campaign against the Tamil Tiger insurgents concluded in 2009, and he was under his command as former head of the defence department. Although he has been accused of war crimes and persecuting political opponents, he has always refuted these allegations.

After two decades of Rajapaksa rule, Gotabaya was elected president of Sri Lanka with the support of the majority Sinhala Buddhist population in 2019.

Protesters who took the streets to raise their displeasure with the government’s handling of the economy and the rising cost of living have won a major success with his resignation.

In Sri Lanka, where a functioning administration is needed to begin pulling the country out of financial devastation, the president’s departure raises the prospect of a power vacuum.

Other politicians have discussed the possibility of forming a new unity government, but no progress has been made toward agreement. It’s also unclear whether or not the general public will accept anything they come up with.

Under the constitution, the prime minister, Ranil Wickremesinghe, should act in the president’s stead if the latter resigns. In Parliament, the prime minister is regarded as the president’s right-hand man.

Wickremesinghe, on the other hand, is a polarising figure. In the case of protesters setting fire to his private property on Saturday, he announced that he would step down to allow for a new government, although he didn’t give a specific date.

Constitutional scholars believe that Parliament’s speaker is the next most likely candidate to serve as interim president. Nevertheless, the public may not recognise Mahinda Yapa Abeywardena’s authority because he is a close associate of the Rajapaksas.

The interim president has 30 days to call an election among parliamentarians to pick a new leader. Depending on the outcome of this vote, Mr Rajapaksa could serve out the remainder of his term till the end of 2024.

Sajith Premadasa, Sri Lanka’s major opposition leader, said he intends to run for president. However, he is also unpopular, and the public has low regard for politicians.

While Sri Lanka has been on the verge of a political shift, the protest movement that has sparked it has yet to produce a clear leader.

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